Dead Men Talking

dead-men-talking:

My goodness, I’m so popular!  Tagged by jangojips AND xiphoidprocess!

Six random facts about my skeletal morphology (from XP)

Custom questions from The Brain Stew

I feel like most people have been tagged by now so :P

Read More

Woops I missed #5 for jangojips, internet had been down for a second and I forgot to go back.

malformalady:

Indian woman Jyoti Kumar, 62, is thought to have had the world’s longest ectopic pregnancy, after an MRI scan (pictured) revealed a child’s skeleton inside her abdomen, after she became pregnant at the age of 24. At the time doctors warned the expectant mother her unborn child had little chance of survival, after it was found to be growing outside of her womb. Terrified at the thought of an operation, she fled and sought treatment for the pain at a small clinic. Months later when the pain subsided, Ms Thakre was convinced the problem had been treated.

malformalady:

Indian woman Jyoti Kumar, 62, is thought to have had the world’s longest ectopic pregnancy, after an MRI scan (pictured) revealed a child’s skeleton inside her abdomen, after she became pregnant at the age of 24. At the time doctors warned the expectant mother her unborn child had little chance of survival, after it was found to be growing outside of her womb. Terrified at the thought of an operation, she fled and sought treatment for the pain at a small clinic. Months later when the pain subsided, Ms Thakre was convinced the problem had been treated.

My goodness, I’m so popular!  Tagged by jangojips AND xiphoidprocess!

Six random facts about my skeletal morphology (from XP)

Custom questions from The Brain Stew

I feel like most people have been tagged by now so :P

Read More

valdanderthal:

dead-men-talking:

Um so that Somaliland field school might actually happen but the thing is I need about $5000 DOES ANYONE KNOW WHO MIGHT GIVE MONEY TO A NON-STUDENT ACTING AS A TA.

image

HAHAHAHAHAHA yeah pretty much.

Um so that Somaliland field school might actually happen but the thing is I need about $5000 DOES ANYONE KNOW WHO MIGHT GIVE MONEY TO A NON-STUDENT ACTING AS A TA.

odditiesoflife:

Victorian Headless Portraits

The Victorian era has many photographs, most of which show the subject sitting or standing with a stern expression. Since photography was still in its infancy, photographers were experimenting with novel ways to create photos that differed from the norm. Animals acting human was one popular concept, and then came the headless portrait. Funny and entertaining, a new genre of photography was born.

ancientart:

"They take first a crooked piece of iron, and with it draw out the brain through the nostrils, thus getting rid of a portion, while the skull is cleared of the rest by rinsing with drugs; next they make a cut along the flank with a sharp Ethiopian stone, and take out the whole contents of the abdomen, which they then cleanse, washing it thoroughly with palm wine, and again frequently with an infusion of pounded aromatics…" -Greek historian Herodotus describes the process of mummification in Egypt (trans. Rawlinson).

Shown here is an extraordinarily well preserved Egyptian mummy at the Louvre. This man lived during the Ptolemaic Period, and his name can be read as either Nenu or Pachery. The body has been sophisticatedly wrapped in strips of linen, and the mummy is covered with a cartonnage. Included here is a mask, an apron across the legs, and a collar over the chest.

Rigault Patricia from the Louvre provides the below description. This is only a section of the full write-up, you can read the rest here if you wish.

A body preserved for eternity

Not everyone in ancient Egypt had access to the funerary practices that ensured eternal life, and many people had to settle for a simple pit in the desert and a few modest offerings. For the more fortunate, preserving body provided an additional guarantee of survival in the afterlife. It offered a new support for the various elements of the living being that were dispersed at the time of death. Although the earliest mummies were little more than bodies wrapped in linen strips dipped in resin, more sophisticated methods soon developed; mummification procedures were highly perfected by the New Kingdom.

Although the number of mummies increased from this period on, the quality of the work tended to decrease. Nevertheless, mummies from the Greco-Roman period are often remarkable for the highly subtle designs formed by the interwoven linen strips. Depending on the period, a mummy could be covered a clothing, a net of beads, a mask, or a decorated wooden plank or cartonnage. During the Ptolemaic Period, various cartonnage elements were arranged on the mummy before it was placed in the coffin. 

Courtesy of & currently at the Louvre, France, N 2627. Photos by: Massimo Palmieri (1), Yann Caradec (2 & 3, cropped), and Oleg Ы (4).

ellenkushner:

malindalo:

This pamphlet asks, “Is College Bad for Girls?”
It examines:
"Evils of Dormitory Life—Midnight Hours of Who Knows What?"
"Flirting & Speaking to Male Students without Proper Introductions & Chaperone."
"Reading Improper Novels, Magazines, & Other Suggestive Literature."
"Forming of Unladylike Habits that May Harm the Health & Morals of a delicate Girl—Such as Smoking & Card Playing."

All true.

ellenkushner:

malindalo:

This pamphlet asks, “Is College Bad for Girls?

It examines:

  • "Evils of Dormitory Life—Midnight Hours of Who Knows What?"
  • "Flirting & Speaking to Male Students without Proper Introductions & Chaperone."
  • "Reading Improper Novels, Magazines, & Other Suggestive Literature."
  • "Forming of Unladylike Habits that May Harm the Health & Morals of a delicate Girl—Such as Smoking & Card Playing."

All true.

So for some reason my body has jumped forward a few timezones and I can’t sleep. All I can think about is how badly I want to go on that Somaliland field school.

scaredystark:

we-other-victorians:

Victorian Prostitutes: Not All Of Them Were Seduced-And-Abandoned
I promised a forthcoming post about Victorian prostitutes who didn’t fit the contemporary stereotype of the “fallen woman,” and here it is. I stumbled on some fascinating articles while trying to find the full text of a letter from a prostitute to the Times in 1858, and found it here at The Naked Anthropologist. They’ve helpfully bolded and highlighted the vital parts of the text, which is itself a response to a previous letter in which the author detailed her proper upbringing and her fall from grace when she was forced into the sex trade. By contrast, this letter-writer tells of her working-class childhood, her start as a prostitute at the age of 15, and her happiness overall at being able to make an independent living and support herself through her own work. She calls out the hypocrisy of reformers in what remains, 150 years later, an epic smackdown for the ages:

You railers of the Society for the Suppression of Vice, you the pious, the moral, the respectable, as you call yourselves, who stand on your smooth and pleasant side of the great gulf you have dug and keep between yourselves and the dregs, why don’t you bridge it over, or fill it up, and by some humane and generous process absorb us into your leavened mass, until we become interpenetrated with goodness like yourselves? What have we to be ashamed of, we who do not know what shame is—the shame you mean?
I conduct myself prudently, and defy you and your policemen too. Why stand you there mouthing with sleek face about morality? What is morality? Will you make us responsible for what we never knew? Teach us what is right and tutor us in what is good before you punish us for doing wrong. We who are the real prostitutes of the true natural growth of society, and no impostors, will not be judged by ‘One more unfortunate’, nor measured by any standard of her setting up. 

I really can’t recommend reading the full letter enough, because it so far predates the modern movement for sex workers’ rights, but it hits so many of the movement’s high points. The twisted, holier-than-thou morality of reformers still plagues so many philanthropic pushes today that this should be required reading for anybody who wants to go into charity work in which they will be helping someone less privileged than him/herself. File this one away under “secret weapon any time someone calls the Victorian era backwards.”
It turns out that the letter caused a stir all the way up the social ladder; Charles Dickens (who was known for his reform efforts with prostitutes) was called upon by Angela Burdett-Coutts, a middle class woman who ran a home for reforming fallen women, to find out the letter writer’s identity and help her. Apparently Dickens didn’t read too far into her letter, or he would have known that she really didn’t care to be rescued. He wrote a letter to the editor of the Times, and when he finished reading the letter, hastily dashed off a second one, retracting his inquiry after the author’s identity:

It seems that when Miss Coutts spoke to me about the letter, it had just attracted her notice and she had not read it through. It further appears that she is immensely staggered and disconcerted by the latter part of it, and is even troubled by its being seen by the people in her household. Therefore I think the writer had best remain unknown to her.

via The Telegraph
The Naked Anthropologist (obviously my new favorite blog) discusses this incident, as well as the use of the “fallen woman” imagery in reform campaigns of the time here. The women were often shown physically on the ground, twisting and gazing upward, desperate for help. And obviously, one prostitute’s story does not diminish or negate another’s; women were forced into prostitution, or maliciously seduced by men and then coerced into brothels once they realized their “honor” had been damaged. But on the whole, when a narrative feels too ubiquitous, it probably is. Look for the dissenters and the exceptions to the rule; they are always more difficult to hear above the din of the majority, but they are telling their stories to the world through one channel or another. Especially for those looking to do philanthropic work of any kind, look for people who don’t want your help and ask why. Benevolence that does not accept a refusal of help is no benevolence at all.
Above, Odalisque by Hippolyte Arnoux, 1880(Arnoux was a French photographer who took pictures of European women posed in Orientalist settings and costumes)

curliestofcrowns

scaredystark:

we-other-victorians:

Victorian Prostitutes: Not All Of Them Were Seduced-And-Abandoned

I promised a forthcoming post about Victorian prostitutes who didn’t fit the contemporary stereotype of the “fallen woman,” and here it is. I stumbled on some fascinating articles while trying to find the full text of a letter from a prostitute to the Times in 1858, and found it here at The Naked Anthropologist. They’ve helpfully bolded and highlighted the vital parts of the text, which is itself a response to a previous letter in which the author detailed her proper upbringing and her fall from grace when she was forced into the sex trade. By contrast, this letter-writer tells of her working-class childhood, her start as a prostitute at the age of 15, and her happiness overall at being able to make an independent living and support herself through her own work. She calls out the hypocrisy of reformers in what remains, 150 years later, an epic smackdown for the ages:

You railers of the Society for the Suppression of Vice, you the pious, the moral, the respectable, as you call yourselves, who stand on your smooth and pleasant side of the great gulf you have dug and keep between yourselves and the dregs, why don’t you bridge it over, or fill it up, and by some humane and generous process absorb us into your leavened mass, until we become interpenetrated with goodness like yourselves? What have we to be ashamed of, we who do not know what shame is—the shame you mean?

I conduct myself prudently, and defy you and your policemen too. Why stand you there mouthing with sleek face about morality? What is morality? Will you make us responsible for what we never knew? Teach us what is right and tutor us in what is good before you punish us for doing wrong. We who are the real prostitutes of the true natural growth of society, and no impostors, will not be judged by ‘One more unfortunate’, nor measured by any standard of her setting up. 

I really can’t recommend reading the full letter enough, because it so far predates the modern movement for sex workers’ rights, but it hits so many of the movement’s high points. The twisted, holier-than-thou morality of reformers still plagues so many philanthropic pushes today that this should be required reading for anybody who wants to go into charity work in which they will be helping someone less privileged than him/herself. File this one away under “secret weapon any time someone calls the Victorian era backwards.”

It turns out that the letter caused a stir all the way up the social ladder; Charles Dickens (who was known for his reform efforts with prostitutes) was called upon by Angela Burdett-Coutts, a middle class woman who ran a home for reforming fallen women, to find out the letter writer’s identity and help her. Apparently Dickens didn’t read too far into her letter, or he would have known that she really didn’t care to be rescued. He wrote a letter to the editor of the Times, and when he finished reading the letter, hastily dashed off a second one, retracting his inquiry after the author’s identity:

It seems that when Miss Coutts spoke to me about the letter, it had just attracted her notice and she had not read it through. It further appears that she is immensely staggered and disconcerted by the latter part of it, and is even troubled by its being seen by the people in her household. Therefore I think the writer had best remain unknown to her.

via The Telegraph

The Naked Anthropologist (obviously my new favorite blog) discusses this incident, as well as the use of the “fallen woman” imagery in reform campaigns of the time here. The women were often shown physically on the ground, twisting and gazing upward, desperate for help. And obviously, one prostitute’s story does not diminish or negate another’s; women were forced into prostitution, or maliciously seduced by men and then coerced into brothels once they realized their “honor” had been damaged. But on the whole, when a narrative feels too ubiquitous, it probably is. Look for the dissenters and the exceptions to the rule; they are always more difficult to hear above the din of the majority, but they are telling their stories to the world through one channel or another. Especially for those looking to do philanthropic work of any kind, look for people who don’t want your help and ask why. Benevolence that does not accept a refusal of help is no benevolence at all.

Above, Odalisque by Hippolyte Arnoux, 1880
(Arnoux was a French photographer who took pictures of European women posed in Orientalist settings and costumes)

curliestofcrowns

scientific-women:

Awww yeah, my lab!

valdanderthal replied to your post: valdanderthal said:You’re being a…

wahoo you got this! And just think! You’re working this hard to get into a grad program where you’ll work even harder!!! Why do we do this to ourselves? haha (such love/hate)

Wellllll as masochistic as it feels right now, I so much prefer this to idleness!  And good luck to you my dear!

Oh hey, if anyone is studying for the GRE, I found a great site that offers a question a day for free!  Message me with your email and I’ll send you the link (so I can unlock a feature :D).