Dead Men Talking
valdanderthal:

Fetal Ilium from Romania
-aged between 38-40 weeks, seen with a non-specific periosteal reaction
Source: abbeygailclaire

valdanderthal:

Fetal Ilium from Romania

-aged between 38-40 weeks, seen with a non-specific periosteal reaction

Source: abbeygailclaire

But it turned out that Joan was really, uncannily good at leading an army. She had skills that no female person who’d spent her life tending house — the thing she was best at, she later told a room full of men, was sewing — had any reason to possess. “She was quite innocent, unless it be in warfare,” says the former roommate. “She rode on horseback and handled the lance like the best of the knights, and the soldiers marveled.” Uh, yeah: I’ll bet they did.

So it turned out she was good, and you all know this part of the story. She was very good at it, despite the fact that she was initially excluded from the important meetings, and despite the fact that she had no training, and despite the fact that she was a woman and people weren’t supposed to listen to those — “harlot,” was a common theory among the English at the time, because what would a woman be doing in the army unless was sleeping with all of the soldiers; one English soldier straight-up laughed at the idea of “surrendering to a woman” — and despite the fact that her whole authority was based on telling people that she had magic powers. She took an arrow in the neck, in the middle of a battle, and kept fighting. If you want to get a sense of what actually made it possible for her to get from a kitchen in the middle of nowhere, to standing in front of the King and making her case, to a leadership position in the military, to leading this one particular hopeless lost cause of a battle, the Siege of Orleans, and winning it, this is instructive. If you want to get a sense of the sheer willpower driving this woman, think about being just a little female teenager from nowhere with no military training, whose biggest talent was sewing, shoved into chaotic, close-range, hugely violent battle, and about what it would take for you not to freak the fuck out at this point, what it would take to keep fighting with an arrow in your neck.
Running Towards The Gunshots: A Few Words About Joan of Arc (via gatheringbones)

strangeremains:

Four days after a missile shot down Malaysia Flight 17 in Ukraine, the remains of some of the 298 victims are headed home.

Ukrainian separatists agreed Monday with Malaysia to let a train with some of the bodies to leave the crash region for Amsterdam where the flight originated. President Obama is accusing the pro-Russian rebels of blocking the investigation by denying experts safe access to the crash scene.

If anyone knows about the science and challenges of recovering and identifying bodies, it is Dr. Bill Bass. The retired founder of the University of Tennessee’s “Body Farm” is one of the top forensic anthropologists in the world. Bass said he has paid close attention to the coverage of the crash site.

"I’ve been keeping up with it every time I turn on the television. Anytime you have an aircraft crash, you’re getting into my area," said Bass. "As a forensic anthropologist, my job in a situation like this would be to identify the individuals. From what I’ve seen, the crash scene and the debris field has already been extremely compromised."

Bass has worked to train FBI disaster response and recovery teams for 17 years. He says the first rule is to secure the scene of a crime or disaster.

Read more at WBIR.com

theolduvaigorge:

Quantitative Assessment of the Sternal Rib End Morphology and Implications for Its Application in Aging Human Remains 

  • by Efthymia Nikita

Intercostal and age differences in the sternal rib end morphology of documented female skeletons from Spitalfields and St. Bride’s are examined. The morphology was captured using three-dimensional morphometrics and the statistical analyses employed included parametric and nonparametric MANOVA, discriminant analysis, and multilinear regressions. It was found that the quantified morphology of the sternal rib end was statistically significantly different between rib four and all other ribs except for the third one and that the morphological characteristics of all ribs varied with age. However, due to the inherent variability in sternal rib end morphology, nonstatistically significant results were obtained among the various age groups and neither disciminant nor multilinear regression analysis could be used for the estimation of the age of an individual based on digitized coordinates of the sternal rib end of individuals of known age, raising some concern as to the rigorousness of the fourth rib aging method” (read more/open access).

(Open access source: Journal of Forensic Sciences 58(2):324-329, 2013 via Academia.edu)

Behind the scenes at the Art Institute of Chicago on Tuesday! There were some Egyptian mummies on the other side of the photographer. (I’m the one with my arm up, wiping away drool.)

Behind the scenes at the Art Institute of Chicago on Tuesday! There were some Egyptian mummies on the other side of the photographer. (I’m the one with my arm up, wiping away drool.)

Science: he who smelt it dealt it.

Science: he who smelt it dealt it.

past-imperfect:

Mummified human baby - Peru, 1909

900-1430 AD

Textile and red paint are present on the head

Two ‘God’s eyes’ were placed on the body made from blue and white cotton threaded onto cane.

(x)

I've been wracking my brain trying to figure out why the sub-dermal connective tissue in cadavers is brown. any chance you or someone you know has the answer?

Oh man I’ve only worked with cadavers once, so I don’t have a definite answer.  Are you talking about preserved specimens or fresh?  I would venture that it has something to do with oxygen and/or blood staining the tissue?  (See my technical jargon?  lol)

Anyone else got an idea?

WHOSE IDEA WAS IT TO HAVE THREE JOBS

texantforimage:

Forensic archaeological advice from the expertise of Alberto Peña: The screen technique helps very well when we count with fragmented burned bones and they are mixed superficially with earth, may be we can find the most useful skeletal fragments for enhance the Minimal Number of Individual.

finally, if we think about the fire activity, we have to look over our heads. Just in the trees that are surround the area we can see smoke marks over the foliage

xiphoidprocess:

Looks like the Pentagon report on the problems at JPAC (the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, also the largest employer of forensic anthropologists in the US and, despite this report, full of some awesome people who do amazing research) is starting to get out. It estimates there are 83,000 POW/MIAs still missing, there isn’t a single database of who those people actually are, and some of the JPAC employees themselves have been trying to make all of this known.

It’s a CBS News video, which says the actual DoD report hasn’t been released yet, so sorry about the not-so-in-depth source. Hopefully soon there will be more.

I’ve thought of going into JPAC down the road.  I hear the work is intense but I assume it’s worth it!

W. T. Actual F.

whenyouworkatamuseum:

Sometimes someone will love your museum so much they will feel moved to sneak in and scatter their relative’s ashes in their favorite exhibit.  

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How we felt after we realized what that trail of dust and bone fragments was. 

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Then we had to clean it up. And there was really only one thing we could do.  

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Inside Knowledge: You Won’t Believe What This Machine Can See

gereports:

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Two days before Christmas 1895, shortly after Wilhelm Röentgen discovered X-rays by experimenting with a cathode tube in his laboratory, he invited his wife to experience the phenomenon. Anna Bertha Ludwig put her left hand inside his apparatus and became the first human to be X-rayed. But when she saw her wedding ring slipped over the bones of her fourth finger, her reaction was far from jubilant. “I have seen my death,” she exclaimed.

Röentgen became immediately famous but it was not until 1913 that X-ray imaging took off. That year physicist William D. Coolidge, a longtime director of the GE Research Laboratory in Schenectady, NY, invented the X-ray Tube.

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A print of one of the first X-rays by Wilhelm Röntgen (1845–1923) of the left hand of his wife Anna Bertha Ludwig. It was presented to Professor Ludwig Zehnder of the Physik Institut, University of Freiburg, on 1 January 1896. Source: NASA

Coolidge kept perfecting his tube and received 83 patents for the technology. The tube effectively started radiology as a medical discipline and launched a series of innovations raging from the X-ray machine to computed tomography.

The latest in that line is GE’s Revolution* CT scanner, which was just cleared for use in the U.S. Where Roentgen and Coolidge could see just shadowy outlines of bones and organs, the new machine can image the heart in just one heartbeat.

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In 1939, GE medical scanners produced X-ray images of mummies for the New York World’s Fair (above). Image courtesy of the New York Public Library. 

The system uses high-resolution and motion correcting technology similar to the image stabilization features in personal cameras. The blend of speed and clarity is important because it allows doctors to retrieve sharper images with higher resolution at lower radiation doses.

Cardiologists can use the Revolution to image patients with high heart rates, oncologists can use its low-dose settings to study liver, kidneys, pancreas and other organs, and neurologists can quickly assess brains of stroke patients. “This will be the first CT scanner that’s right for physicians in every clinical specialty and provides answers from one CT exam,” said Steve Gray, president and CEO of GE Healthcare MICT.

The FDA just issued a 510(k) clearance, which clears the device for use in the U.S.

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Circle of Willis supplies blood to the brain: Low dose high definition neuro CT angiography 120kV / 200mA / 0.8 sec rotation.

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 An image from triple rule-out, a CT procedure that can be used for patients with acute chest pain: Low kV gated chest CT angiography 80kV / 450mA / 0.28 sec rotation / BMI 23 / bpm 56-59.

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A high definition image of carotid arteries. The circle of Willis is in the center of the skull: 2 volumes 100kV / 300mA / 0.8 sec rotation / BMI 25 / 2.3mSv.

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This image captured by GE’s Revolution CT scanner shows the human heart with stents typically used to treat narrow or weak arteries.

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Fast body imaging of the pelvis and the abdomen: 4 volumes 
120kV / 280mA / 0.5 sec rotation / BMI 29 / 10mSv.

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Fast body imaging of the pelvis and the abdomen: 4 volumes 
120kV / 280mA / 0.5 sec rotation / BMI 29 / 10mSv.

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The Revolution CT can image the whole aorta: Fast body vascular imaging using 4 volumes 120kV / 415mA / 0.4 sec rotation / BMI 29 / 12mSv.

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High-definition musculoskeletal imaging with screws: 1 volume 
140kV / 120mA / 0.5 sec rotation.

*Revolution CT is a GE Healthcare trademark.

Stuff You Missed in History Class - The Doctors' Riot of 1788
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missedinhistory:

Sawbones is a show about medical history. It’s for fun. Sometimes it’s also for giving me ideas for podcast subjects, which is what happened with today’s episode. After listening to the Sawbones episode Corpse Theft and the Resurrection Men while on a plane, I decided we needed an entire episode just on the Doctors’ Riot of 1788. That’s when a giant mob of people got so angry that buried bodies were being dug up for dissection that they stormed two different sites of medical study in New York. This was just one of at least 17 so-called anatomy riots in the U.S. between 1765 and 1854.

Here’s a link to our notes and research. We also hook you up with two places to learn whether England and France were at war in a given year. Since these are also for fun, please no pedantry about whether “England” or “France” is really the right name.

his-name-was-writ-in-water:

A Roman collar. Could either have belonged to a dog, or a slave. Fastened to the ring of iron is a metal disc bearing a Latin inscription:

fugi tene me

cvm revoco 

v eris me dm. zonino accipis solidvm

Which translates to “I have escaped - my master, Zonius, will give you a gold coin on my return.”

We can’t be certain if it belonged to a slave or a dog, as I said, but that alone tells us a lot about Roman slavery.